First of the Tenth: a manifesto for a new academic practice

I will get back to science fiction soon, but I had to get this down, in the light of recent experiences.

A Manifesto: a utopian (re)vision of academic practice

First, ALIENATION now commands academia: alienation of teachers from researchers, faculty from management, academics from the products of their labour, and increasingly, students (as consumers) from education. The first principle of A NEW ACADEMIC PRACTICE must be to challenge alienation through new working practices, through non-hierarchical teaching environments, and through a revision of the investigation, writing and dissemination of research.

Second, the role of the academic in contemporary society, and in particular the relation of the individual to the institution, requires systematic re-evaluation and analysis. This analysis must encompass the conditions of labour under which academics now work, and the relation between that work and the research and teaching they produce. Academics now work to produce research outputs which enter into a system of evaluation and monetization (Research Excellence Framework, REF), where a competitive judgement between institutions and between individuals loosens collective bonds. Far from being an oasis of unalienated labour, academic research is now thoroughly commodified, yet the researcher receives nothing of the surplus value of her work: little payment is received for academic publishing, which may include years of work; editing duties (particularly for academic journals) is performed pro bono and the paywall-protected access to that work is monetized to enrich publishing houses; and the system of external grant application, a disciplinary system in which the chances of success are less than 20% but of which participation (and perhaps success) will increasingly be tied to promotion, often results in no remuneration for individuals and little for their departments.

Third, the academic must strive for OPEN DISSEMINATION and discussion of all ideas. This cannot be instrumentalized and monetized as ‘Impact’ or other forms of measurable and thereby auditable activity, but must actively promote the common good. The systems of ‘open access’ currently implemented (involving internal competition for funding to pay for the placing of articles in ‘gold access’ journals) again displace the financial imperatives and profits onto an atomized and competitive research marketplace. Instead of open access, we must demand OPEN DISSEMINATION, which will necessitate the destruction of ‘ranking’ systems of evaluation for REF that explicitly hierarchize journals in terms of status. New modes of publication and dissemination, digital and print, must be explored as a matter of urgency.

Fourth, the academic must actively and collaboratively resist the shift of the expected role of the academic from researcher and teacher to external income generator. The academic must also resist the economic exploitation of the postgraduate community, in terms of teaching and research, which currently underpins conditions of postgraduate study.

Fifth, higher education must be considered in terms of the COMMON GOOD, not in terms of individual training for business or careers, but in terms of social benefit in the widest sense. Therefore, it should be free to ALL students who wish to attend university and who demonstrate the ability and determination to do so. The academic community must forge bonds of SOLIDARITY with the broader social fabric. Differential access, in terms of class, ethnicity, age, disability, or other criteria must be directly challenged.

Sixth, the current funding model for universities, which has encouraged both rapid privatisation and marketisation of teaching, research and support services, the transfer of the cost of education from society to the individual, and the imposition of a disciplinary managerialism, must be dismantled.

Seventh, the academic must strive for INTELLECTUAL ACTIVISM, for engagement with the material conditions of everyday life. This can take many forms. The role of the ‘public intellectual’, derided and evacuated in contemporary public discourse, must be re-discovered. The current professoriat, far from blameless in the acquiescence of marketization, must recover a role in this re-orientation. The PUBLIC role and operation of universities must be re-asserted as the academic recovers the PUBLIC role of open dissemination of ideas and challenge to received and official narratives of the economic, social and cultural fabric of contemporary life.

Eighth, academics must consider their work in the light of OPEN DISSEMINATION. In this regard, they must consider published works (articles, books, digital works) as acts of communication between PRODUCERS OF IDEAS and the PUBLIC. They must consider themselves to be WRITERS, to be self-conscious and to develop A PRACTICE OF CRITICAL WRITING that encourages engagement and enjoyment in the reader. While technical language is a necessity to any advanced discipline, a disavowal of the pleasures of reading and writing leads to poor communication and inhibits dissemination. Rather than this being a plea for ‘plain language’, academics should develop their skills of writing to encompass strategies and techniques from fiction and ‘creative non-fiction’.

Ninth, the purpose of academia, and its relation to teaching, is to encourage and instil critical thought and intellectual activism. Students should share in the practices of critical thought, writing and communication. Collaboration and the breaking of hierarchical boundaries through innovative and participatory teaching methods are crucial.

Tenth, in a society in which dissent is discouraged and the Fourth Estate (the press) has largely abandoned its critical and political role, the university and the academic must seize the opportunity to challenge, rather than actively participate in, the economic and social policies which will result in the destruction of the values and ethics that should underpin these institutions. We must ask ‘what is a university for?’, as well as ‘what is an academic?’ The debate must become explicit.

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